Florida Corporate Dissolution Law

Corporations – Corporate Dissolution – Florida

Related Florida Legal Forms

Statutory References:

FLORIDA STATUTES, §§607.1401-607.1406

General Discussion:

I. There are two ways to dissolve a Florida corporation:

1. By the Incorporators of Directors if the corporation HAS NOT issued any shares or has not commenced business.

2. By the vote of a majority of the shareholders of the corporation upon recommendation of the Board of Directors or upon the written consent of the shareholders without any action by the Board of Directors.

II.  DISSOLUTION BY THE INCORPORATORS OR DIRECTORS

1. If the corporation has not issued shares or commenced business, then that corporation may be dissolved by the Incorporators or by the Directors by the filing of Articles of Dissolution

2. The corporation is dissolved upon the effective date of the filing of its Articles of Dissolution (unless another date is specified).

II. DISSOLUTION BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND SHAREHOLDERS OR BY WRITTEN CONSENT OF THE SHAREHOLDERS

1. The Board of Directors may propose to the shareholders that the corporation be dissolved.  For a proposal to dissolve to be adopted by the shareholders, the proposal MUST be recommended by the Board. The Board may determine that there is a conflict of interest or that other special circumstances exist and that it should make no recommendation regarding dissolution.  In that event, the decision of the Board to make no recommendation and the reasons for that decision should be communicated to the shareholders.

2. EVERY shareholder must be notified of a shareholder’s meeting to consider dissolving the corporation.

3. Unless the Board of Directors or the Articles of Incorporation require a greater vote, the Resolution of the Board must be approved by a majority of the shareholders.

4. In the alternative, the shareholders may, without action of the Board, agree by written consent to dissolve the corporation.

5. Once the decision to dissolve the corporation has been made and approved, then you must file Articles of Dissolution.

6. The corporation is dissolved upon the effective date of the filing of its Articles of Dissolution (unless another date is specified).

III.  EFFECT OF DISSOLUTION

1. A dissolved corporation continues its corporate existence ONLY to wind up and liquidate its business and affairs.  This process includes:

a. Collecting assets.

b. Disposing of property which will not be distributed in kind to shareholders.

c. Discharging or making provision for discharging liabilities.

d. Distributing any remaining property among shareholders;

e. Any other act necessary to wind up and liquidate the business and affairs of the corporation.

2. Dissolution of a corporation does not:

a. Transfer title to the corporation’s property;

b. Prevent transfer of the corporation’s shares or securities.

c. Change the standards to which the corporation’s directors or officers are to comply.

d. Change quorum or voting requirements for the board of directors or shareholders, provisions for selection, resignation, or removal of its directors or officers or both, or provisions for amending its bylaws.

e. Prevent the commencement of any proceeding by or against the corporation.

f. Abate or suspend any proceeding pending by or against the corporation on the effective date of dissolution.

g. Terminate the authority of the registered agent of the corporation.

3. As distinguished from a corporation which is not dissolved, the directors, officers, and agents of a dissolved corporation do not incur any personal liability by reason of their status as directors, officers, and agents of a dissolved corporation.

IV.  CLAIMS AGAINST A DISSOLVED CORPORATION

A dissolved corporation may dispose of the known claims against it by following these procedures:

1. The dissolved corporation shall deliver to each of its known claimants written notice of the dissolution. The written notice shall:

a. Provide a reasonable description of the claim.

b. State whether the claim is admitted or not admitted, totally or partially.

If the claim is admitted, then the notice shall state the amount admitted, the interest obligation, if any, and

c. Provide a mailing address where a claim may be sent.

d. State a deadline, not less than 120 days after the effective date of the notice, by which confirmation of the claim must be received.

e. State that the dissolved corporation may make distributions, after the noticed deadline, to other claimants and/or to shareholders or other interested persons without further notice.

2. A dissolved corporation may totally or partially reject any claim made by a claimant. If a claim is rejected, notice of the rejection must be mailed to the claimant within 90 days after receipt of such claim and, in all events, at least 150 days before expiration of three years following the effective date of dissolution.

3. A dissolved corporation which wishes to dispose of claims against must also give notice of the dissolution of the corporation to persons with claims which are contingent, conditional, or unmatured.

4. A dissolved corporation must offer any claimant whose claim is contingent, conditional, or unmatured such security as the corporation determines is sufficient to provide compensation to the claimant if the claim matures. The dissolved corporation shall deliver such offer to the claimant within 90 days after receipt of such claim and, in all events, at least 150 days before expiration of three years following the effective date of dissolution. If the claimant offered security does not reject the offer in writing within 120 days after receipt of the offer for security, the claimant is deemed to have accepted such security as the sole source from which to satisfy his or her claim against the corporation.”

5. A dissolved corporation or successor entity which has given notice as set out above for claims which are NOT contingent, conditional, or unmatured claims, shall petition the circuit court in the county where the corporation’s principal office is located or was located at the effective date of dissolution to determine the amount and form of security that will be sufficient to provide compensation to any claimant who has rejected the offer for security.

6. A dissolved corporation or successor entity which has given notice as set out above for contingent, conditional, or unmatured claims shall petition the circuit court in the county where the corporation’s principal office is located or was located at the effective date of dissolution to determine the amount and form of security which will be sufficient to provide compensation to claimants whose claims are known to the corporation.


Inside Florida Corporate Dissolution Law